The Science of Mischief

There would be few children who haven’t read George Marvellous Medicine. And there would be fewer still who haven’t heard about its author, Roald Dahl. His books have showed both young and old alike the magnificence of imagination.

George’s Marvellous Medicine was a book I read so many years ago. But a few days ago, I came across a child of my mom’s friend, who was frowning over this book. I sat next to him, a kid no more than seven or eight years of age, who clutched the dog-earned book with a casualty that edged on boredom. “What’s that, Kevin?” I asked.

“It’s this book mom chose for me,” he said, “It’s so dumb!” I was quite surprised. When I was his age, my friends and I would be waiting at the doors of the library to grab the book when it was returned by someone else.

“Why? What’s wrong with the book?” I asked him.

“It’s so ridiculous!” he said, “it’s has no scientific background! I mean, nobody can grow that big because you mixed a lot of chemicals. Plus, you’ll die instantly!”

“Well, it’s just a book, Kevin! It’s supposed to be enjoyed!” I retorted.

“Eww! Why would you read all these when you can read so many other book that are ten times more interesting and have solid facts!” He shut the book with a bang, threw it at me and walked away.

I looked open-mouthed at the boy who was walking away, leaving the bright red book with me. I did not know what to make of this. The first question that came to my mind was, is education killing all the imagination in us?

I re-read the whole book, from the beginning. Yes, my interest in these children’s books had waned over the years. Yet, I read on. It was funny sometimes and I laughed out loud. I couldn’t find why it looked so repulsive and pointless to a young boy who should be the one finding it a gem.

Have we truly forgotten to enjoy the fruits of imagination? Has childhood been marred so much that we are not able to let children enjoy the happiness of being in a fantasy world where anything is possible? I use the word ‘mar’ because me and you have both enjoyed the unbelievably good joy of being able to believe in something even if it may be impossible.

I remember how I wanted to be characters from my favourite books and how I grew out of them. I don’t think generations to come will ever have that honour. And I say this with a sorrow, that surprises me immensely.

3 Responses to The Science of Mischief

  1. CNNIE says:

    AISWARYA: I THINK THE AGE OF ELECTRONIC STIMULATION OF THE MIND WITH VIDEO GAMES, AND TELEVISION PROGRAMS HAVE DULLED THE IMAGINATION OF CHILDREN TO THE POINT THAT BOOKS TO THEM ARE USELESS,,,ESPECIALLY THE IMPOSSIBLE ONES. I READ VORACIOUSLY AS A CHILD. I EVEN RELISHED THE DAILY NEWSPAPER. WE COULD NOT AFFORD TO HAVE ONE DELIVERED, SO I WOULD ASK THE NEIGHBORS FOR THEIRS, AND I READ THAT THING FROM FRONT TO BACK…OF COURSE MY TELEVISION WAS LIMITED, AND VIDEO GAMES WERE FUTURISTIC….KEEP ON BELIEVING….CONNIE

  2. Dear Aiswarya,
    I read your short article. The truth is that we all have different tastes and talents. In many respects, even you and me are different. I can’t grasp every thing some one writes. Every thing depends up on the taste of our mind. If it is tasteful to the mind, we can even finish 1000 pages within a short time. In short , it is our mind which is making all the mischief.
    Any way, nice subject, and nice article. I really tasted it.
    T. Koovalloor

  3. ashok says:

    Great the change of women world

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