Untitled text from an unnamed woman

A successful woman is the most vulnerable. There will be many people to tell her that she is talented, that she is strong and determined. There will be people to call her More »

The impotence of being young and being old

There is nothing called too much loneliness. Either you are alone, ruminating on the chances of a possibility, any possibility, of breaking that immovable reverie; or you’re lonely, staring into empty chasms More »

Of Faby and his father Interview with Director K. Sreekkuttan

The fate of José Arcadio Buendía in Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, who, with only his astronomical calculations found out that the earth was round, would still be a bit painful. More »

Slumdogs and other insignificant humans

A man stands in the shadows in an unknown alleyway in an unknown street in a known city. His face cannot be read, but his face is tired. He wipes the sweat More »

The Lighter Side of the Fantasy Maker: Interview with writer Robert Taylor

Reading Robert Taylor’s stories are like watching a thriller movie. Surprises comes out when you least expect them, and then they push you into the deep, deep voids of fantasy. Yes, he More »

Saintly cargoes in sailing coffins

The creases on the forehead aren’t creases. They’re the defined gifts of knowledge. They’re the lifelines of experience, and one should stand on tiptoes to see them. And when one’s carried by More »

The Science of Mischief

There would be few children who haven’t read George Marvellous Medicine. And there would be fewer still who haven’t heard about its author, Roald Dahl. His books have showed both young and More »

Diplomacy befitting enmity

Taking the newspaper and reading it completely shocked me today. My eyes glued themselves to one corner of the paper, wherein lay the source of astonishment. In a diplomatic, almost balanced tone More »

 

Fisherwoman

I see her every morning on her way to business

Printed cloth around her legs, a red blouse

Carrying her basket of old fish, listless

She is, listless. She is fisherwoman-

Listless until her first fish has gone away.

Readers in an Adult’s World: Laments of a Teenager

Week after week, I watch out for the special days when the newspaper boy throws in the ‘special’ Hindu- Melange and Metroplus- two supplements I crave with the curiosity of a ten year old. And promptly, I receive my share of Khyrunissa, and deeply miss Krish’s Ashok’s exceptionally crafted Armchair with a View, that not so long ago my teacher introduced me to during a Theory of Knowledge lesson in school.

However, nearly always I sit back a little disappointed, having read Confessions of an Anonymous woman, or the ranting of authors angered at rising onion prices, of wacky children and inconsiderate husbands, cultural issues, political mess…all problems of an adults world- to be read and digested and ruminated by the polite glass-clad uncles and aunties sitting beside freshly brewed filter coffee on the weekends.

Why we shouldn’t whine and other thoughts

Thus I watched Richard Turere on Ted Talks, explaining how he made peace with the lions. If you do not know who Richard Turere is, allow me to explain. This Kenyan lad has come all the way from his meager life in the savannahs of his rural country, to be a scholarship student in one of Kenya’s best international schools. And why? Because he could scare off the lions from attacking his family’s livestock, using an old car battery, torch lights and some wires to create a sequence of flickering lights. The lights scared the lions off, and everybody was saved and nobody hurt. His idea has taken over the whole country, and many a poor family can use this method to save their means of livelihood.

Of Faby and his father Interview with Director K. Sreekkuttan

The fate of José Arcadio Buendía in Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, who, with only his astronomical calculations found out that the earth was round, would still be a bit painful. Melquíades had to regretfully inform that in the world outside Macondo, this fact had already been made simple by other men, who’d found it before him. Yet Melquíades praised him before the whole village, for his magnificent intellect. The disappoint that José Arcadio Buendía  felt  that day could be compared to the disappointment this particular young boy went through after he made a model of a stationary machine gun. However, two months after the model- a cassava stem contraption stuck together with pins- was put on show in his backyard, the real Rheinmetall MG3 found its way to the then magazines and newspapers. Talk about being disappointed, one would’ve felt robbed! But that wasn’t the end of this young man’s ventures. Years later, the same young lad grew up to make Asia’s first animation film- something that was beyond the imagination of the multitudes.

Slumdogs and other insignificant humans

A man stands in the shadows in an unknown alleyway in an unknown street in a known city. His face cannot be read, but his face is tired. He wipes the sweat off his brow, and clutches his cloth bundle tightly. Business has closed for the night in the inner cities, but in this part it is still open. Sleepy eyed owners try to woo in more customers before they close. As the night ages, the shops close, one by one. First go the hawkers and the street-vendors as their bhel and paani-puris lose their charms, then the pop-ups who draw their tarpaulin sheets and curl up inside their make-shift roofs of asbestos sheets beneath sticks and stones. Drunkards and beggars lie like fallen ballerinas-crushed by worry, snoring lightly. Finally, the shop that had been the point of such intense curiosity, by that man in the shadows, drops its shutters with a sound that wakes the beggar on the pavement, but only slightly. The shopkeeper tucks a bunch of keys into his pants, hands a wad of money to his assistant who gleefully touches it to his forehead in respect and then they part ways.

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